Child Support

Child Support Attorney in Shakopee, Minnesota Including Scott County, Carver County and Dakota County

By law, both parents are obligated to contribute financially to the care and well-being of their child(ren). Mr. Peterson is a Minnesota child support lawyer can help you with any child support issues you face. Child support in Minnesota includes three components:

  • Basic support payments;
  • Medical support; and
  • Child care support

In most cases, the payment of child support continues until a child reaches 18, or graduates from high school, whichever is later.

Minnesota Child Support Guidelines

Minnesota has a specific set of guidelines for calculating child support. Theses guidelines were recently changed to reflect the income of both parents, and the amount of time each parent spends with the child(ren). The income of each parent is compared, and an appropriate percentage of the money required to raise a child is allocated among the parties on a monthly basis.

Failure to Pay Child Support

Child support that is not paid in a timely manner becomes an arrearage, which cannot be forgiven, without an appearance before the court. In Minnesota, the consequences for non-payment of child support following a court order include:

  • Denying or revoking a driver’s license;
  • Taking tax refunds (federal and state);
  • Denying or suspending occupational licenses (for example, a license to practice law);
  • Denying or revoking recreational licenses;
  • Denying or revoking a passport;
  • Placing a lien on a car;
  • Referral to a private collection agency;
  • Telling a consumer reporting agency that they did not pay child support;
  • Placing liens on property;
  • Putting a hold on bank accounts;
  • Charging interest on any past due support; or
  • Placing the payer in prison, through a court action, for not paying child support.

The foregoing penalties are typically imposed following a contempt proceeding.

Denial of Parenting Time

The court treats child support and parenting time as two separate issues. A failure to pay child support will not affect parenting time with your child(ren). When a court determines parenting time, it will only be concerned with the best interests of the child(ren). The failure to pay support is not a legally valid reason to deny or restrict parenting time.

Contact Christian Peterson Law Office for a free consultation!

Have additional questions? We offer free consultations to all potential clients. Call (612)269-1902, email at christian@crplaw.com or complete our free case evaluation form.